The Americans: Season 6, Episode 3: Urban Transport Planning Recap

13 Apr

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Urban Transport Planning is all about the concept of home. What does home mean to Elizabeth? Home is everything to Elizabeth. Home is mother Russia, the Soviet Union. Home is why Elizabeth does everything she does, what drives her to kill innocents and risk her life every day without ever feeling doubt or guilty. Home is what she, as she makes clear to Paige during their tete-a-tete, is willing to die for without fear. Home is also, of course, as Philip sharply and succinctly points out to her, is a place she hasn’t been to in 20 years.

All that time away, however, has only made Elizabeth’s feelings for home grow stronger. Elizabeth had a very special relationship with her mother and warm memories of her childhood, even though, or especially because she went without the materialistic goods that are so plentiful in America. Home is the smell of the native dishes Claudia cooks with her. Home is an idea; a time or privation which made the people and the relationships between them stronger, not weaker.

The problem, as Philip points out, is the home Elizabeth’s fighting for may no longer exist, at least the way she remembers it (if it even existed then) and she wouldn’t even know it. Elizabeth is at heart an instinctive reactionary; she yearns for her magical idealized past. There’s no clearer evidence than the knee-jerk look of disgust on Elizabeths’ face when Philip suggests that there will soon be a Pizza Hut in Moscow.  She doesn’t want any of Gorbachev’s changes. She doesn’t know anything about their actual effect in the USSR, but she’s suspicious inherently of any change. Elizabeth is so insistent that this is merely what the Americans want, and likewise that her people can’t possibly want it. Globalization, the US and Russian cultures bleeding into one another would ruin the purity of her perfect home.

Her immigrant’s idea of giving her daughter a better life is having her work as a 9-to-5 spy doing paperwork in a government office rather than as a field agent. One might argue she cares more about the Soviet Union than she cares about Paige, because if she really cared about Paige, she would let her avoid the stressful and dangerous spy lifestyle, but Elizabeth would never see it that way. Because she cares so much about both Paige, she can think of no greater gift than giving Paige a piece of her beloved home and introducing her to the mission that structures Elizabeth’s life and that she treasures so much.

Philip, on the other hand, as we’ve known for the length of the show, doesn’t feel at all like Elizabeth about his childhood and the USSR. He’s embraced and cherishes his new American life. That’s his home now; his time in Russia is a distant memory. He lives in the present and the future while Elizabeth lives in the past. A world in which there’s no need for their type of spycraft and all the death and destruction that comes with it appeals to him (Elizabeth would say imagining such a time will ever exist is incredibly naive). He hates the charade. He just wants to have a typical American life; a fulfilling career and suburban family with a chicken in the pot and two cars in the garage. He symbolically rejects Elizabeth’s offer of traditional Russian food, snuck back to the house in a rare breach of protocol by Elizabeth, having gorged himself on American takeout Chinese food instead.

He has none of Elizabeth’s sense of mission, which we’ve known since the beginning, but the difference this season is that Philip seems tired of sitting silent and letting Elizabeth lead the family. He’s finally ready to do something about the fact that no longer can his dream and Elizabeth’s coexist in perfect harmony. When he looks forlornly at Elizabeth sleeping, when he strikes back at her sentimental pean to home less than sympathetically, he’s no longer willing to let Elizabeth’s singular view go unchallenged.

Paige’s future is on the line, if it hasn’t been decided already. Elizabeth dresses Paige down for her breach of protocol last episode, running in when she heard danger. In the situation, Elizabeth’s certainly right. Paige put everyone at risk with her actions, and if she was anyone else, she’d likely be killed in punishment. In their line of work, they can’t break procedure no matter what. Elizabeth’s soldierly mindset was built off this system.

But that’s not Paige. Philip lost the battle never to tell Paige about who they really were. He lost the battle never to bring her on as an agent. Paige is so under the spell of her mother, as Philip was for so many years, that her own feelings get buried beneath Elizabeth’s iron will. This is not what Philip wanted for her. Watching Paige slip farther and farther away from him is a major motivating factor for Philip to challenge his wife.

When Elizabeth talks with the Russian priest, again pining for the magic of home, (a home which the minister mentions many of the kids he teaches about the culture have never been to) she mentions that she gets the impression Philip feels like he’s losing Paige to her, and she’s right. Philip is insistent on keeping Henry away so one of his children can have a typical American life, assisting on the winning hockey goal. Henry got away (at least so far as Philip can keep paying those boarding school bills).

After Paige comes in distraught early in the episode, Philip remarks to Elizabeth that now she’s seen everything. Elizabeth knowingly replies that she hasn’t seen everything just yet. There are seven more episodes for Paige to potentially learn how far Elizabeth has to go every day, how many men and women she kills, without hesitation or second thought for her mission. The relationships between Paige and Elizabeth and Philip and Elizabeth are liable to be tested like never before this season because of what Philip knows and what Paige doesn’t.

 

 

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